Quick Answer: How long was a Marine tour of duty in Vietnam?

All US military personnel serving in Vietnam during the Vietnam War were eligible for one R&R during their tour of duty (13 months for marines, 12 months for soldiers, sailors, airmen).

How long was an average tour of duty in Vietnam?

A tour of duty in Vietnam for most ground forces lasted one year.

How long was 2 tours in Vietnam?

‘ During the Vietnam War, the U.S. Army used a personnel rotation policy that at first blush defies military logic. The Army rotated soldiers through Vietnam on one-year tours. Officers also spent a year in country, but only six of those months were in a troop command.

How long did a draftee have to serve in Vietnam?

Draftees had a service obligation of two years, but volunteers served longer tours—four years in the case of the Air Force. Another alternative was to join the National Guard or the Reserve, go to basic training, and then serve out one’s military obligation on training weekends and short active duty tours.

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How long do marine tours last?

First-term married Marines (or first-term Marines with dependents) serve a 12-month unaccompanied tour. In a very few cases, these Marines may be approved for a 24 month accompanied tour. All other Marines served the standard tour lengths, which is 36 months for accompanied and 24 months for unaccompanied.

Why did marines serve 13 months in Vietnam?

The thirteen month overseas tour preceded the Vietnam War for Marines. Marine units would often deploy to an overseas location without their families. These deployments were limited to thirteen months to reduce the hardship imposed on the families by having the Marine away from home.

How long was a Vietnam deployment?

There was a one-year deployment period for Vietnam, where soldiers served 365 days and returned home.

How long was the average soldier in Vietnam?

The normal length of time was 12 months for the army and 13 months for marines. The one mitigating factor was if you had 89 or less days left in the service you could be officially discharged when you rotated out of Vietnam.

How long did soldiers have to serve in Vietnam?

The majority of service members deployed to South Vietnam were volunteers, even though hundreds of thousands of men opted to join the Army, Air Force, Navy, and Coast Guard (for three or four year terms of enlistment) before they could be drafted, serve for two years, and have no choice over their military occupational …

What is the average length of tour of duty?

As of 2018, typical tours are 6-9 or even 12 months’ deployment depending upon the needs of the military and branch of service. Soldiers are eligible for two weeks of leave after six months of deployment.

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What percentage of Vietnam veterans actually saw combat?

What percentage of Vietnam veterans actually saw combat? Of the 2.6 million, between 1-1.6 million (40-60%) either fought in combat, provided close support or were at least fairly regularly exposed to enemy attack. 7,484 women (6,250 or 83.5% were nurses) served in Vietnam.

What is the longest a Marine can be deployed?

These deployments can last up to six months. Marine Expeditionary Brigade (MEB): AN MEB is a part of a MAGTF and is used to meet the requirements of a specific situation. These deployments can last up to 30 days. Individual Augment (IA): An IA can be up to one year in length.

Where do Marines go after boot camp?

The School of Infantry (SOI) is where Marines go after Marine boot camp to continue their training as a Marine. The School of Infantry is divided into two different schools; Infantry Training Battalion (ITB) and Marine Combat Training (MCT).

How many times does a Marine get deployed?

That’s about one in five Marines in the force today. Of those Marines, 18,580 — or fewer than one in 10 Marines — have deployed twice. The number of Marines in today’s force who have deployed three times is about 6,500, and only 2,181 Marines have four or more deployments, according to Manpower and Reserve Affairs.